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Glenbuchat Heritage

167 The Haugh Glen Nochty
The Glenbuchat Image Library
167 The Haugh Glen Nochty

The Haugh, Glen Nochty

The recent felling of trees along the Nochty near Auchernach has exposed the ruins of a significant steading there, ‘The Haugh’

Above are pictures of an 1850 map of the Haugh croft and recent pictures of the ruins. Click link at foot of page for Larger Version of the pictures.

Partly from Strathdon vitals

The following are some deaths of people who were resident at the Haugh

Robert Shand
1879 November Seventh 1h 5m PM – Haugh Auchernach, Strathdon
Cause: Bronchitis, 7 days. As certified by W. Coutts LRCP &c
Informant: Wm Provest, Occupier (present)
1879 November 7th at Strathdon. James Wattie, Registrar

Ann Beattie Nee Watson
(Married to Adam Beattie farmer, previously widow of William Stewart, farmer, see below)
1875 August thirteenth 4h 55m PM Haugh of Auchernach Strathdon
F: 72 years
Parents: George Watson, farmer (deceased) & Mary Watson ms Grassick (deceased)
Cause: Senile decay, hemiphlegia one month 22 days.
As certified by Geo W Beattie MDCM
Informant: Robert Stewart, son Boggach Strathdon
1875 August 14th at Strathdon. James Wattie, Registrar

William Provest was the informant of the death of Robert Shand (Above)

1881 Scotland Census about William Provest
Name: William Provest
Age: 44 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1837
Relationship: Head
Spouse's name: Mary Provest
Gender: Male
Where born: Strathdon, Aberdeenshire
Registration Number: 240
Registration district: Strathdon Civil Parish: Strathdon County: Aberdeenshire
Address: Haugh of Auchernach
Occupation: Farmer (Of 70 Ac. Of Which 36 Arab. Empy. 1 Woman)
Household Members: Name Age
William Provest 44
Mary Provest 44
Isabella Provest 9
Ann Beattie 37
Elizabeth Davidson 22

1881 Scotland Census about Ann Beattie
Name: Ann Beattie
Age: 37 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1844
Relationship: Sister-in-law
Gender: Female
Where born: Strathdon, Aberdeenshire
Registration Number: 240 Registration district: Strathdon Civil Parish: Strathdon County: Aberdeenshire
Address: Haugh Of Auchernach
Occupation: General Servant (Out Of Employ)

William Stewart
Spouse
Ann Watson, b. 1803, Strathdon and Corgarff
(Married to Adam Beattie farmer, previously widow of William Stewart, farmer)
Children
1. Isabella Stewart, b. 1823, Strathdon and Corgarff
2. John Forbes Stuart, b. 27 Oct 1824, Strathdon and Corgarff
3. Robert Stewart, b. 1827, Strathdon and Corgarff
4. William Stewart, b. 11 Jul 1830, Strathdon and Corgarff
5. Charles Stewart, b. 26 Oct 1832, Strathdon and Corgarff
6. Mary Stewart, b. 08 Feb 1835, Strathdon and Corgarff

John Forbes Stuart (Stewart) 1824 - 1880
Birth 27 Oct 1824 Strathdon and Corgarff
Died 15 Dec 1880 Kildrummy
Father William Stewart
Mother Ann Watson, b. 1803, Strathdon and Corgarff
Spouse
Helen McBain, b. 06 Jan 1840, Strathdon and Corgarff
Married 08 Aug 1840 Strathdon and Corgarff
Children
1. Elizabeth Stuart, b. 03 Dec 1863, Kildrummy
2. Ann Stuart, b. 29 Dec 1866, Kildrummy
3. Catherine Stuart, b. 17 Feb 1869, Kildrummy
4. John Stuart, b. 28 May 1871, Kildrummy
5. Helen Stuart, b. 04 Nov 1873, Kildrummy
6. Alexander Stuart, b. 18 Jun 1879, Kildrummy
1841 enumerated @ Boggach, Strathdon with mother, stepfather, siblings Isabella, William, Charles and Mary and half-sister Ann
1851 enumerated @ Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon (carpenter) with mother, siblings William and Mary and half-siblings Ann and George
1861 enumerated @ KirkHill, Kildrummy (house carpenter) with half-siblings Ann and George
1871 enumerated @ KirkHill, Kildrummy (house carpenter/farmer) with wife and daughters Elizabeth, Ann and Catherine

Births at the Haughs
1824 Dec 2 - Alexander Watson in Haugh of Auchernach & his spouse Ann Wattie, a son George
1826 May 22 - Alexander Watson in Haugh of Auchernach & his spouse Ann Wattie a daughter Catherine
26th April 1828 - Alxr Watson in Haugh of Auchernach & his spouse Ann Wattie had a child Baptized named Ann
1831 Watson - April 17 - Alexr Watson Haugh & Isobel McPherson had a child in fornication baptised this day named John

Christenings
County of Aberdeen - Strathdon revised 20 April 2009

1770 March 2nd Hary Farquharson in Haugh of Achernach son William
1782 October Hary Farquharson in Haugh of Auchernach & Jean Downie his spouse a son Robert
1787 Geo: Watson & Mary Grassich in Haugh of Auchernoch a daughter Isabel
1791 Augt 22 George Watson & Mary Grassich in Haugh of Auchernach a daughter Margaret
1794 March 22 Geo. Watson in Haugh of Auchernach & [blank] Grassich his spouse a son Alexander
1795October 24 Geo Watson & [blank] Grassick his wife in Haugh of Achernach a daughter Helen
1800 Augt 18 Geo: Watson in Haugh of Achernach & [blank] Grassich his spouse a son John

1851 census
Haugh Auchernach

Ann Beattie Head Mar 48 Farmer 12 acres
Ann do Daur 9 Scholar James do Son 6 Do
George do Son 3
John do Son U 26 Carpenter
William do Son U 20 Do
Mary do Daur U 15 Scholar

The following article from highlights the problem of smuggling in the Nochty area.
Glen Nochty is at the foot of the ladder Hills. There is a path over he hills from Glenlivet and was a notorious for whisky smuggling.

John Watson of Auchernach outlawed for deforcement
From From Life in Glen Nochty

Men of Corgarff were more often apprehended for the crime of deforcement (forcefully preventing excise officials from discharging their duties) than the men of Glen Nochty. But it seems from the following case that the men of Glen Nochty could be even more difficult to apprehend (extracted from the National Archives of Scotland High Court record JC 11/68 with their kind permission):

In Aberdeen on 22 April 1824, before Hon David Monypenny of Pitmilly, in what was then called the Itinerant Judiciary of the Northern Circuit (of the High Court), those present included the Sheriff Substitute of Aberdeenshire, the Sheriff Depute of Banffshire and the Sheriff Depute of Kincardineshire. The record reads ‘John Watson now or lately residing at Haugh of Auchernach on Noughtyside in the parish of Strathdon & County of Aberdeen for the crime of assaulting obstructing and deforcing officers of the revenue (etc) and the same John Watson having failed to appear Lord Pitmilly decrees and adjudges the said John Watson to be an outlaw and fugitive from his majesty’s laws and ordains him to be put to the horn and his moveable goods and gear to be escheat and inbrought to his Majesty’s use for his contempt and disobedience in not appearing this day and place in the hour of cause (etc) as he was lawfully cited (etc) and failed to appear.’

As it happens we have a pen picture of this judge in Lord Cockburn’s memorials published in 1856, who described David Monypenny as being ‘of good sense, but of moderate ability with no legal learning beyond what an ordinary hand to mouth lawyer needs, and no power either of speaking or writing beyond that of clear statement, his judicial powers were very considerable, far beyond his powers as a counsel.’

Lord Cockburn also lends colour to the proceedings in his description of circuit journeys:
‘The temptation of the inn frequently produced a total slippage of business, during which all concerned, judges and counsel, clerks, jurymen and provosts had a jolly dinner, after which they returned to the transportations and hangings. I have seen this done often. It was a common remark that the step of the evening procession was far less true to the music than that of the morning.’

From Roots Web

More details about John Watson mentioned above.

George Watson
Birth: 1752
Death: 29 Oct 1841 in Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon,
Burial: Aft 29 Oct 1841 Strathdon Churchyard, Strathdon,
Census: 1841 Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon,
Occupation: 1841 Farmer
Marriage 1
Mary Grassick b: 25 Jun 1761 in Finnylost, Strathdon
Children
1. Isabel Watson b: 19 May 1787 in Strathdon,
2. Jean Watson b: 22 Apr 1789 in Strathdon,
3. Margaret Watson b: 22 Aug 1791 in Strathdon,
4. Alexander Watson b: 22 Mar 1794 in Strathdon,
5. Helen Watson b: 24 Oct 1795 in Strathdon,
6. John Watson b: 18 Aug 1800 in Strathdon,
7. Ann Watson b: 1803 in Strathdon,
8. Mary Watson b: Abt 1806 in Strathdon,

From Glen Nochty Web Site

In 17 April 1831 (Strathdon OPR) Isobel McPherson had an illegitimate son baptised John Watson son of Alexr Watson, Haugh of Auchernach (John Watson was servant at Tolduquhill in 1841, journeyman tailor with James Callam husband of Mary Farquharson in Bridgley, Strathdon in 1851 and died in Rhinmoir, Strathdon in 1856; Alexr Watson, son of George Watson and Mary Grassick, and widower of Ann Wattie who died in 1829 emigrated to Canada about 1832 -information from Suzanne Walker)

Margaret Watson
Birth: 22 Aug 1791 in Strathdon,
Death: 10 Dec 1856 in Trafalgar, Halton, Ontario, Canada
Christening: 22 Aug 1791 Strathdon,
Father: George Watson b: 1752
Mother: Mary Grassick b: 25 Jun 1761 in Finnylost, Strathdon
Marriage 1
Robert Shand b: Bef 1805 in probably
Married: 23 Feb 1825 in Leochel-Cushnie,
Children
1. Mary Shand b: SEP 1825 in Leochel-Cushnie,

Alexander Watson
Birth: 22 Mar 1794 in Strathdon,
Death: Aft 1830 in Canada
Christening: 22 Mar 1794 Strathdon,
Emigration: Aft 1830 Canada
Father: George Watson b: 1752
Mother: Mary Grassick b: 25 Jun 1761 in Finnylost, Strathdon,
Marriage 1
Ann Wattie b: 20 Feb 1799 in Mill of Newe, Strathdon,
Children
1. George Watson b: 2 Dec 1824 in Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon,
2. Catherine Watson b: 22 May 1826 in Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon,
3. Ann Watson b: 26 Apr 1828 in Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon
From Family Tree Maker

John George Watson
Birth18 August 1800 in Aberdeenshire,
Death26 July 1886i n Chinguacousy, Peel, Ontario, Canada
Parents & Siblings
George Watson1747 - 1841
Mary Grassich1761 - 1840
Spouse
Jemima Rook1809 - 1880
Children
Mary Watson1829 –
George Watson1831 - 1874
John Watson1834 –
William Watson1836 –
Alex Watson1839 –
Egerton Green Watson1841 – 1914
Eleanor Watson1843 –
Jane Watson1843 –
Jemima Watson1843 - 1925
Joanna Watson1844 –
Richard Watson1846 –

Ann Watson
Birth: 1803 in Strathdon, 2
Death: 13 Aug 1875 in Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon, 3
Father: George Watson b: 1752
Mother: Mary Grassick b: 25 Jun 1761 in Finnylost, Strathdon
Marriage
William Stewart b: Abt 1799 in probably Strathdon,
Married: Abt 1822 in probably Strathdon,
Children
1. Isobella Stewart b: Abt 1823 in Strathdon,
2. John Forbes Stuart b: 27 Oct 1824 in Boggach, Corgarff, Strathdon
3. Robert Stewart b: Abt 1827 in Strathdon,
4. William Stewart b: 11 Jul 1830 in Boggach, Corgarff, Strathdon,
5. Charles Stewart b: 26 Oct 1832 in Boggach, Corgarff, Strathdon,
6. Mary Stewart b: 8 Feb 1835 in Boggach, Corgarff, Strathdon,
Marriage 2
Adam Beattie b: Abt 1797 in Strathdon,
Married: 10 Nov 1839 in Strathdon,
Children
1. Ann Beattie b: 18 Apr 1841 in Boggach, Strathdon,
2. James Beattie b: 13 Apr 1844 in Strathdon,
3. George Beattie b: 12 Jun 1847 in Strathdon,
Census: 1841 Boggach, Strathdon, 4
Census: 1851 Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon, 5
Census: 1861 Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon, 2
Census: 1871 Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon, 6

James Beattie
Birth: 13 Apr 1844 in Strathdon,
Death: 11 Jun 1873 in Auchernach House, Strathdon,
Burial: Aft 11 Jun 1873 Strathdon Churchyard, Strathdon,
Census: 1851 Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon,
Census: 1861 Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon,
Father: Adam Beattie b: Abt 1797 in Strathdon,
Mother: Ann Watson b: 1803 in Strathdon,
Marriage 1
Margaret Stewart b: 22 Dec 1837 in Kirkmichael, Banffshire, Scotland
Married: 11 Dec 1866 in Cromdale & Inverallan & Advie, Inverness, Scotland
Children
1. James Stewart Beattie b: 11 Feb 1868 in Strathdon,
2. Alexander Beattie b: 4 JAN 1870 in Haugh of Auchernach, Strathdon,
3. Ann Beattie b: 27 Nov 1871 in Auchernach House, Strathdon,
4. George Watson Beattie b: 26 Jun 1873 in Auchernach House, Strathdon,


Road Dispute

There is an interesting record of a court case in 1829 between Nathaniel Forbes owner of the newly built Auchernach House and Major Alexander Forbes the local landowner about the use of the roads near his house.

In 1694 John Forbes of Inverernan purchased Upper and Nether Tolduchulls from them, including the miln of Tolduchull, which fell into dis-use during the famine of the 1690s (Aberdeen University MS 3175/M/A93). Tolduchull or Toldaquhill is up the track from The Haugh.

In 1825 Maj Gen Nathaniel Forbes of Auchernach sought to prevent the use of the track across the Haughs of Auchernach by Major Alexander Forbes of Inverernan, proprietor of the Mill of Toldaquhill and of the farms of Upper and Nether Toldaquhill, or by his tenants Charles Farquharson senior, Charles Farquharson junior, William Farquharson, John Farquharson, Charles Farquharson, Robert Farquharson, William Wattie, James Glennie and William Glennie, or by their servants or cottars.

February 20 1829 No 149 General Forbes v Major Forbes Servitude Road

This was an action, brought by the pursuer General Forbes, to have the defender and his tenants prohibited from frequenting a road which passed through the defender's lands and to have it declared that the pursuer in virtue of his titles had good and undoubted right to the lands in property free of any servitude, either of a foot road thoroughfare for horses and other bestial, or cart and carriage road through the same in favour of the defender and his tenants servants or cottars and that the pursuer was entitled to debar and exclude them and all others from trespassing upon his said lands. In defence it was pleaded ‘That the defender and his tenants had not only acquired a prescriptive use of the road in dispute as a servitude road but it had been used by all and sundry as a public road from time immemorial’. After the record had been closed and the case had been remitted to the Jury Court a minute was lodged for the pursuer in which he admitted that the road had been used without interruption as a horse and foot road by the defender, and that it had been used as a communication with the roads leading to the lower parts of the country for a period of 40 years. He denied, however, that it had been used either as a public or private cart or carriage road for a period of 40 years but admitted that it had been used by the defender without interruption as a cart and carriage road since the introduction of carts about 30 years ago into that part of the country. This minute was answered by the defender who stated that he was willing to rest satisfied with the admissions in the minute that he did not wish to incur the expense of a proof or of a Jury trial and consented that the case should be sent back to the Court of Session.

The case, having been remitted, accordingly the Lord Ordinary pronounced the following interlocutor 2d February 1822. The Lord Ordinary having heard parties at the Bar on the closed record and minute of admission of facts by the parties and since advised the cause, assoilzies the defender from the conclusions of the summons and decerns. Finds the defender entitled to expenses and remits to the Auditor of Court to tax the same reserving to the pursuer if so advised to apply to the local magistrates for leave to turn round the road in question.

The Lord Ordinary heard parties yesterday at the bar and has since advised the process. The facts must be held to be established by the admission in the foregoing minute and answers which are tantamount to a special verdict of a jury. The pursuer admit that the road in question has been used without interruption as a horse and foot road by the defenders and as a communication with the roads leading to the lower parts of the country for a period of forty years. But he denied that it had been used either as a public or private cart or carriage road for a period of forty years although he admitted that the same had been used by the defenders without interruption as a cart or carriage road since the introduction of carts about thirty years ago into that part of the country. The admission that this road had been used as a horse road and the denial that it bad been used either as a public or private road for carts certainly implies that it had been used as a public road for horses and also for carts since the introduction of them into that part of the country and accordingly the admission was so understood by the defenders who answered that they would have proved the road in question to have existed as a public cart and carriage as well as a public horse and foot communication road &c. But say they as it is admitted by General Forbes, that it had so existed as a public horse and foot communication road without interruption for time immemorial and upwards of forty years prior to November 1825, the commencement of the present action and as a public cart and carriage road ever since the introduction of carts, they the defenders would pass from any other proof and rest on this admission.

Here the defenders distinctly announced to the pursuer their understanding that he had admitted the road to have been not private servitude, but a public horse road for upwards of forty years, and a public cart road since the introduction of carts. If the pursuer did not mean to admit the public nature of the road, he ought to have intimated to the defenders that they had mistaken his meaning and thereby put it in their power to go to proof of their allegations. But be made no objections whatever to the construction which they put on his admission and therefore the Lord Ordinary holds that the road in question was a public horse road for above the years of prescription and a public cart road since carts were there used.

In this state of matters it can be in no other situation than were the whole public roads of Scotland before carts were introduced, which the Lord Ordinary imagine is not of great antiquity, as he believes that people carried commodities from one place to another in panniers, on the backs of horses, yet it was never heard of that men were stopped by any proprietor through whose grounds a public road conducted because they were using carts to convey what had been always carried on the backs of horses. Lord Stair mentions the Roman servitudes of iter actus and to and adds, ‘Our custom stieketh not. Do this distinction but measureth the way according to the end for which it was constituted and by the use for which it was introduced’. This is applicable to private servitudes but the principle applies equally to public roads as to private. His Lordship says Public Ways are those which are constituted for public use which is self-evident. Now if a public road be for the use of the public and the law regards the end for which it was constituted, it is as clear as any proposition can be, that when men introduce generally carts drawn by horses or oxen to transport their commodities from one place to another, instead of carrying them on horses the right of public road must be extended to that object.

This appears to have been understood by the pursuer himself or his predecessors, for he admits that the defenders used carts without interruption ever since they were introduced into that part of the country, which he says is about thirty years ago. The Lord Ordinary therefore assents to the right of the defenders to us carts, as they have done for thirty years bygone.

There is in the summons a conclusion that, in class, the defenders should be found entitled to a road, the pursuer on giving them another at a short distance should be entitled to shut it up. The Lord Ordinary does not consider this to be proper or even competent fur this Court to entertain in the first instance The jurisdiction over public roads, ferries and bridges and of turning round public roads is vested in the Commissioners of Supply Justices of Peace, Sheriffs, Lords of Regality and Barons, by many statutes and particularly for turning round roads by 1661 c 41 and 1685 c 39. These Magistrates living on the spot are alone the proper judges in the first instance. The right and jurisdiction of this Court is only to redress any grievance or correct any error that they may commit. The former see the localities and judge of them by actual inspection, the latter know them only by the reports of others and by charts.

The pursuer having reclaimed against the above interlocutor the Court unanimously adhered.

Lord Ordinary Cringletie Act Matdroent Alt Skene CF Davidson WS and John Gordon WS Agents Mr Fergusson Clerk

Auchernach Laddie
Peter McGregor son of William and Sophia McGregor of the Haugh is the subject of a bagpipe tune ‘Auchnernach Laddie’, mentioned elsewhere in this web site.

1851 Scotland Census about Wm Mcgregor
Name:Wm Mcgregor
Age:5 Estimated Birth Year:abt 1846
Relationship:Son
Father's Name:Peter Mcgregor
Mother's Name:Isobel Mcgregor
Gender:Male
Where born:Strathdon, Aberdeenshire
Parish Number:240 Civil parish:Strathdon County:Aberdeenshire
Address:Park Villa
Occupation:Scholar ED:4
Household Members:NameAge
Peter Mcgregor46
Isobel Mcgregor39
Peter Mcgregor7
Wm Mcgregor5
James Mcgregor2
George Mcgregor20
John Mchardy18

1861 Scotland Census about William Mcgregor
Name:William Mcgregor
Age:13 Estimated Birth Year:abt 1848
Relationship:Servant
Gender:Male
Where born:Strathdon, Aberdeenshire
Registration Number:240 Registration district:Strathdon
Civil parish:Strathdon County:Aberdeenshire
Address:Haugh Of Auckernach
Occupation:Shepherd ED:4
Household schedule number:45 Line:21 Roll:CSSCT1861_33
Household Members:NameAge
Adam Beattie64
Ann Beattie58
Mary Stuart26
James Beattie17
William Stuart5
William Mcgregor13

Peter McGregor
Birth abt 1844 in Strathdon, Aberdeenshire
Spouse
Isabel Ann Glennie (1845-1926)
Children
Alexander McGregor (-)
Isabella McGregor (-)
Margaret McGregor (-)
Peter McGregor (1878-)
1870 15 Sep Age: 26 Marriage to Isabel Ann Glennie St Nicholas, Aberdeen
1901 Age: 57 Residence Strathdon, Aberdeenshire,

Peter McGregor
Birth abt 1878 in Strathdon, Aberdeenshire
Parents
Peter McGregor (1844-)
Isabel Ann Glennie (1845-1926)
1901 Scotland Census 1901 Age: 23 Residence Strathdon, Aberdeenshire








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